Protect Yourself from Mayhem (a.k.a. Counteroffers)

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No matter which side of the desk you are sitting, counteroffers are a short-term fix.
If you are the person that has been offered the additional money, promotion, flextime, etc. in order to stay in your current role, why did it take the threat of you leaving to get what you are worth? Why didn’t you deserve that salary increase or new title this morning or yesterday, before you turned in your notice?

Isn’t it curious that your optimistic new employer recognized your value after just a conversation or two and made a winning offer?

How pleased do you think your employer is that you’ve gone outside the organization looking for a new job? Do you think they will regard you as that loyal, long-term, above-and-beyond employee anymore?

What happens the next time there are scheduled reviews and raises? Think you’re going to get a dazzling review or a marvelous raise? More than likely not.

If there are layoffs, what are the chances you are one of the first to be considered? On a scale of 1 to 10, undoubtedly 10.

Was it more money, a promotion or flextime that made you decide to look for a new position? Do you think the specifics that prompted you to search will change? Doubtful.

Now that the company has gotten you to stay, do you think they might start looking for your replacement; someone that can slide right into the position, just as you get comfortable with that bigger paycheck?

Don’t run out and buy that new car or house. You may come into work to find your desk occupied by someone demanding a tapered salary. His/her skills might not be the same, but that’s okay. There won’t be an unplanned interruption. The employee can learn and won’t have expectations of extraordinary advantages. The company can afford for them to take a little time for them to become totally competent.

If you are the person/company that offered the higher wage, is it sustainable?
How long do you think your employee will be doing cartwheels with happiness? Statistics show for about six months to one year. Then, they’re out the door anyway.

Think the employee will be the only one expecting an increase? People talk, no matter what your company policy.

How do you think your other employees feel? Are you setting a precedent? Think they’ll decide to come in and threaten to leave so they get an increase? Or, if they don’t, how long before they hold a grudge because so-and-so got a raise even though they were outside the company looking for a new job? They may be thinking, “Here I am, day in and day out, doing my job well, and he/she is the one that received the advantage”.

Do you think they will produce their best work or be a long-term employee? They may on one of the job boards, or calling a recruiter as we speak.

As you can see, no matter which side of the desk you are sitting, counteroffers are a short-term fix.